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Two Free Tickets for O’Reilly Web 2.0 Expo New York

I know my blogging has been a bit inconsistent this summer and for that I apologize. I’m hoping to get back on track starting now!

The awesome folks at TechWeb and O’Reilly Media are letting me attend Web 2.0 New York (September 16-19th) and have also offered two TOTALLTY FREE tickets to give away for readers of LeveragingIdeas! For anyone who has never attended an O’Reilly conference they are THE events for anyone in the web 2.0/startup space. It’s an amazing opportunity to listen to some of the most thought-provoking leaders in the technology space — and to network with web 2.0 Illuminati, investors and startups. Tickets are normally $1300 — so believe me, this offer is a big deal.

I’ve decided the most equitable way to give away the tickets is by asking interested readers to support two causes that I’m truly passionate about:

Ticket One:

I launched StartupTweet.com last week and have gotten a tremendous response. However, there is still a ton of great content out there on the web that needs to find its way onto the site. Therefore, over the next two weeks, the person who contributes the most (in terms of total, quality posts) to StartupTweet will win one ticket. Remember, the more content posted, the more we can empower each other to be better informed. [Contest officially ends September 1st at 12pm.]

Ticket Two:

I have been having a strange health issue this summer and it’s more personal than I care to get into. However it has highlighted the dismal state of healthcare/health insurance in this country for those who cannot afford it. I’m looking for guest posts inspired or written by visionary thinkers willing to suggest solutions (technology-based, or otherwise) to this dire issue. The best guest post will win the second ticket. [Last day to submit a post is August 31st. ]

Have at it.

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • robjohnson

    Brad Feld's father Dr. Stan Feld writes a great blog about healthcare policy problems in the US.

    http://stanleyfeldmdmace.typepad.com/

  • Rob – Thanks so much for drawing that to my attention, I had no idea.
    I was lucky to talk with Brad a couple weeks ago and assuming that the
    apple doesn't fall far from the tree, I'm sure Dr. Feld is also
    brilliant. I look forward to checking this blog out!

    Thanks so much for the link!

  • My parents forwarded me this link from today's Hartford Courant: http://www.courant.com/business/hc-individualpo

  • Hi Sam,

    Will check out your Twitter startup….thanks for making this offer available…..we recently made the decision not to attend 2.0 b/c of cost :(

    It's a big price tag for a startup company….but you give us hope :)

  • My parents forwarded me this link from today's Hartford Courant: http://www.courant.com/business/hc-individualpo

  • Hi Sam,

    Will check out your Twitter startup….thanks for making this offer available…..we recently made the decision not to attend 2.0 b/c of cost :(

    It's a big price tag for a startup company….but you give us hope :)

  • My parents forwarded me this link from today's Hartford Courant: http://www.courant.com/business/hc-individualpo

  • For ticket No. 2:

    In order to save our healthcare system, we need big compromises from everyone.

    First, trial lawyers need to accept tort reform. I recall the NYT times editorial this past year that asserted that trial costs are “less than 5% of health care costs” – First, that’s a really big number. Second, I think they ignored the cost of settlements, spiraling malpractice insurance and defensive medicine.

    Second, insurance companies need to reduce administration costs and play more fair with patients. I heard you can get a masters degree in how to fill out insurance forms. Ever see all the different forms at a doc’s office? Give insurance companies one year to come up with a single form for doctors to use. I’d recommend a single payment system (doctors only interface with one form/system) rather then a single payor system. Moreover, we need better regulations regarding how and when they deny coverage. For example, if it’s a preexisting condition issue, let my current insurance battle it out with my prior insurer, not me. I shouldn’t need a trial lawyer to get the coverage I paid for.

    Also, we’ll need rock solid regulations regarding privacy to avoid people becoming uninsurable based on unauthorized release private medical info- this is a growing concern with electronic records and companies who will screen your genes by mail (check out http://www.23andme.com). We want to encourage people to get such tests to allow any preventative measures so we should ensure obtaining such information is not penalized.

    Third, customers should have co-pays and incentives to take care of themselves. No one should have an “all you can eat” buffet-style healthcare. Consumer’s should be rewarded with take preventive measures (go to routine check-ups) and penalized (higher co-payments) when they don’t. We shouldn’t penalize people for who they are (bad genes), but rather how they act (bad habits).

    Forth, doctors/health, they need to implement current information technologies. (FastCompany had an article several months ago outlining some of the major IT innovations in healthcare- it’s finally starting to happen – Welcome to the 90’s healthcare.)

    On another note relating to the government being able to negotiate drug prices, we need to think through the impact this will have on innovation. That is, if the gov’t negotiates prices with pharmaceutical companies it will have enormous bargaining power, decrease the profit margins pharma can make and impact R&D efforts. If we move in that direction, I think could be an opportunity to better focus pharma’s R&D. For example, give them better bargaining (e.g., a “safe harbor” where the gov’t cannot use its bargaining power) for breakthrough drugs (e.g., cancer, aids, Alzheimer’s), but not for the many “me too” products they currently focus their R&D efforts to develop. Do we really need another Viagra or H-2 antagonist? There’s a guy at Harvard who wrote a great article about how big pharma doesn’t do beneficial R&D (I think it was in the NY Times).

    I think we should give private health care a fighting chance. However, what’s described above are just some of the changes needed to make is work.

    Regards, John